So How Do You Name Your Pieces?

Gothic Bazaar, Mixed Media, 11 x 14, $175.00

Sometimes people ask me how I come up with my titles. Well, I enjoy naming my pieces almost as much as I do creating them in the first place. I try to invent names that give the viewer a hint of what I was thinking while I was painting, but at the same time, something that leaves a bit of mystery, a little question in their minds. I’m calling this piece Gothic Bazaar. Why? Well, the pointed arch is a bit of Gothic architecture, isn’t it? And the colors remind me of the time I visited the bazaar in Istanbul, full of golds and secret passageways and hidden corners. Touristy? Sure, but all the same exotic and fun. Everything about this–the design, the colors, and yes – even the title, says Whimsy. A bit of whimsy to brighten up a cold winter day.

Painting in the Abstract

In my previous post, I wrote about using a 12 x 12 format to express a single idea, but sometimes, I need a bigger canvas to capture the moment. A River Runs Through It reminds me of the colorful river towns perched on the hilltops in Spain. The water rushing down the mountains, the clean, fresh air! Aah–how delightful.

A River Runs Through It, acrylic, 20 x 24

New Small Paintings

I love working in a small, 12 x 12 format. It forces me to really think about what I want my painting to say, because the small space doesn’t lend itself to a lot of miscellaneous flourishes. Here are a few pieces I’ve done in the past few months. By the way, Facebook has somehow removed my page (and no–I haven’t been posting anything horrible!), and I’ve decided to just let it go, so if you have a comment, please post it here on WordPress, or just contact me directly. The pieces here are all 12 x 12, Acrylic and mixed media, framed and ready for display.

Inspiration
Midnight Dream
Oh, Happy Days!

Still Life

Still Life with Turkish Pot, acrylic, 20 x 16

I bought this Turkish coffee pot in Istanbul years ago, in a little bazaar filled with rugs and leather jackets and the aroma of exotic spices. Today seemed like a good day to put it into a painting, using autumn tones but hopeful little flowers to help us get through the winter that’s almost upon us. When Spring comes again, we can hope that most of us will have been vaccinated, and we can begin to emerge into the light again.

Art vs. Craft: What’s the difference?

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                                                   Apple, acrylic, 14 x11  ($125 + $10 shipping)

I just saw a fascinating documentary, “Tim’s Vermeer,” produced by Penn & Teller.  It’s the story of Tim, who theorizes that Vermeer used a camera obscura to create his amazingly realistic paintings.  This theory is well known, but there are problems with it.  Tim set out to overcome the problems.  He made and modified a camera obscura, and actually built the entire scene of “The Music Lesson.”  He then painted the scene, using his invention.  He proved that Vermeer could have similarly used his own camera obscura to achieve the great level of detail in his paintings.  At the end of about 130 days, Tim had recreated an exact replica of Vermeer’s painting.

Yet something was still missing from the painting.  It lacked the magic that Vermeer brought to his work.  Why is that?

An artist must master her craft, surely.  More than that, though, the artist uses composition, the effects of light and color, the choice of subject matter, to elevate the craftman-like work to the level of art.  It’s seeing ordinary things in a different way.  Maybe it’s a sort of magic, after all.

Choosing a Subject to Paint

When I first began painting, I tried hard to find interesting subjects.  I started out by painting scenes from my travels.  Then I painted imagined scenarios using old family photos as references.  They were very nice.  I sold a lot of those paintings, and I still like most of them.  But the longer I practice art, the more I realize that the simplest things can be the subject of interesting paintings.  Here is an unusual perspective on breakfast:  a cup of coffee and an orange.

Coffee, Acrylic, 10 x10, $90 (+$10 shipping)

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Acrylic vs. Oil: Does It Make a Difference?

Acrylic, 10 x 10, $90 (+$10 Shipping)

Acrylic, 10 x 10, $90 (+$10 Shipping)

I used acrylic paint for finished paintings in Arizona, because I was in a rented house and didn’t want the fuss and mess of oils.  I was surprised to find that not only does acrylic paint dry much faster, but that it also influences a painter to use different techniques.   With oils, there is time to soften edges, play with the paint, blend colors, scrape and wipe out.  With acrylic, the painter doesn’t have this luxury.  Instead, you have to work quickly, and I found that acrylics lend themselves to harder edges, more glazing colors over each other, and brighter colors.   Which way is better?  What do you think?  Compare my landscapes, all done in oils, with my latest acrylic still life paintings.

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